Stress and cognition: psychometric properties of the Perceived Stress Scale and associations with cognitive functioning, prefrontal symptoms, and cognitive complaints

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Abstract
Introduction. The Cohen?s Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) is the most widely used instrument worldwide to measure perceived stress; however, there are no psychometric analyses in the Venezuelan general population. Moreover, theory suggests that stress could have effects on cognitive functioning through prefrontal symptomatology and cognitive complaints. Aims. To analyze the psychometric properties of the EEP and to determine the relationship of perceived stress and cognitive functioning through prefrontal symptoms and cognitive complaints. Subjects and methods. The EEP, ISP-18, MFE-30, and MoCA tests were administered to a sample of 223 participants (Mage = 33, SD = 12.82; 64% female). Confirmatory factor analyses were run to determine the fit of the EEP versions, and structural equation models were performed to analyze the relationships between variables. Results. The structure of the EEP with the best fit was composed of ten items and two factors called perceived uncontrollability and perceived efficacy. Also, the structural model obtained an excellent fit to the data and highlights that the effect of stress on cognitive functioning occurs through prefrontal symptoms and cognitive complaints (? = -.303; EE = .123; p = .013). Discussion. The EEP-10 is a brief, valid and reliable tool to be used in a Venezuelan context. The effects of perceived stress on cognitive functioning occur through a serial mediation involving individuals? perception of their executive functioning and everyday cognitive failures.
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Journal
Ansiedad y Estrés
Year of Publication
2023
Volume
29
Issue
2
Number of Pages
115-123
Date Published
07/2023
Type of Article
Journal article
Publisher
ISSN Number
1134-7937
ISBN Number
2174-0437
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DOI
10.5093/anyes2023a14