Coping and rheumatoid arthritis: A critical review

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Abstract
Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease which causes pain, stiffness, deformity and physical impairment. Individual differences of coping have been pointed out as good predictors of adjustment in patients with RA. The present study is focused on a theoretical overview of some of the works which have studied coping strategies in RA population: its evaluation and its relationship with adjustment. We have divided coping strategies in two different groups: the big categories of coping, and the specific styles of coping. The extent and limitations of each group have been reviewed. Results show that active, problem focused, behavioral, and attentional pain coping strategies (big categories of coping), as well as cognitive restructuring, use of coping selfstatements and self-efficacy belief factors (specific styles of coping), are associated with a better adjustment in RA patients. On the other hand, passive, emotion focused, cognitive, and avoidant pain coping strategies (big categories of coping), as well as wishful thinking or fantasies, selfblame and catastrophizing (specific styles of coping) are associated with worse adjustment.
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Journal
Ansiedad y Estrés
Year of Publication
2001
Volume
7
Issue
2-3
Number of Pages
139-150
Date Published
07/2001
Type of Article
Journal article
Publisher
ISSN Number
1134-7937
ISBN Number
2174-0437
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