What adaptions are effective to cognitive behavioural interventions for adults with long-term conditions and medically unexplained symptoms? A systematic review

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Abstract
Aim: Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services were set up in the United Kingdom in 2008. Recent service expansion now accommodates patients with long-term conditions (LTC) and medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) through the use of cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). A systematic review is yet to be completed to identify specific adaptions that may be effective for improving outcomes. Many countries are building upon this model within the United Kingdom; therefore, the findings can inform developing services internationally. Methods: Electronic databases were searched and studies were screened against an inclusion/exclusion criteria. Studies evaluating the effectiveness of CBT interventions on mental health outcomes for adults with LTC/MUS within primary care were included. Data were extracted for analysis and a narrative synthesis was conducted. Quality assessments were made using the Effective Public Health Practice Project tool. Results: Of 14,380 papers, eight papers were included within the review. Moderate to strong evidence found CBT adaptions were effective in improving outcomes, including the specific focus on the LTC/MUS within treatment, the inclusion of collaborative care or implementing a range of therapeutic skills. Weak methodology was associated with selection bias, lack of blinding and reporting around the validity and reliability of data collection tools. Conclusions: CBT adaptions may be effective at improving mental health outcomes for those with LTC/MUS in the short term. Due to the small amount of studies included within the review, conclusions remain tentative. It is unclear as to whether interventions can sustain outcomes and provide financial gains in the long term.
Keywords
Year of Publication
2020
Journal
Ansiedad y Estrés
Volume
26
Issue
2-3
Number
Number of Pages
188-201
Date Published
jul
Publisher
ISSN Number
1134-7937
ISBN Number
2174-0437
URL
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1134793720300300
DOI
10.1016/j.anyes.2020.07.002