Stress responses and the effects of early experience: Behavioral, physiological, and neuromorphological evidence

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Abstract
When organism (eg. Birds, mammals, humans) perceive a threatening situation they produce a number of psychobiological responses (stress responses) that, even if they are initially adaptative (to confront the stressful stimuli, or to escape from them), they can also induce damaging effects in the long run. One of these effects appears to be that of endangering neurons in particular brain areas. Thus, as seen in laboratory rodents and in primates, the animals that present enduring and excesive stress responses (eg. a maintained glucocorticoid hypersecretion) are those that will display accelerated neuronal aging and death, particularly at the hippocampal level. The present work revises –using the example of two particular lines/strains of rats (RHA/Verh and RLA/Verh) which differ in their stress reactivity profiles- some relevant aspects of the physiology and neurochemistry of stress, as well as the possibility of preventing excesive stress reactivity and its neurotoxic consequences by certain infantile experiences (postnatal stimulation and environmental enrichment).
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Journal
Ansiedad y Estrés
Year of Publication
1998
Volume
4
Issue
2-3
Number of Pages
135-170
Date Published
07/1998
Type of Article
Journal Article
Publisher
ISSN Number
1134-7937
ISBN Number
2174-0437
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